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I have a 2019 Model X with 17K miles on it. On December 4th the car started giving me issues. December 8th it would no longer start. We had to have it towed to the Tesla Service Center in Rockville, MD. Service guys took several days to figure out what was happening. At first they tried to give me Uber credits, but I told them no way. Had to fight for a loaner. December 10th they informed me that they have to order a 12 volt battery for it. I follow up with them every week to check on the status of the battery. They have no clue as to when they will get the battery. It is now January 17th and pushed my date out to the end of the month, but there is no confirmation that I'm even getting a battery. The service center says that I cannot escalate my situation because they don't have anyone to escalate to. Tesla does not care about their customers once they sell them the car. This is ridiculous that I still have to wait for a simple 12 volt battery and the poor customer service doesn't help.
 

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Someone told me a 2012 Nissan Leaf 12v fits - the specs look real close, perhaps slightly? better in the leaf. I'm looking into one for my car
 

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@aliupup, I have never heard of there being a substantial delay for a 12 V battery. Nor would it take multiple days to diagnose the need for that. So is it the car's main, high voltage battery they are replacing? That is definitely understandable that that could take awhile. You did get a loaner… is it a Tesla? I know there is nothing like having your own car back, but the bright side is that you are not putting miles on your own car.
 

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Someone told me a 2012 Nissan Leaf 12v fits - the specs look real close, perhaps slightly? better in the leaf. I'm looking into one for my car
My 2012 Nissan LEAF SL takes a 12v the same size as my Model 3: 51R. I replaced my LEAF's original 7-year-old Japan-built 12v about two years ago with an Interstate battery from Costco for about $80 then. More recently, I've called around local auto shops to gauge availability of 51R batteries in case my Model 3 goes kaput and the three places I called all had them in stock. And that's in a city of 34,000 people. So far thankfully, I've gotten no indication my Model 3's 12v is having any problems despite being 3½ years old, 06/2018 build month.

Perhaps Tesla's source for 51R batteries is supply-chain constrained, but it would seem to me that, instead of keeping a premium-priced Model X in the shop and its owner upset albeit with a loaner, just go to the nearest Autozone or wherever and get an off-the-shelf 51R, replace it, and move on. But that's me. Maybe a 51R is not always a 51R, is not a 51R. But I doubt it.

It's a bit like restaurants that say we're out of chicken, eggplant, whatever, and are located next to a large grocery store. Really? You can't go buy another chicken or two?
 

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Produce more and stock up on the batteries considering this is a known issue for X and S. Simple fix.
"produce more" is most definitely easier said than done these days. The global supply chain issues are so severe, companies have been removing USB ports from their vehicles!!! Though that's not an excuse to use after a month. Curious, have you had the loaner the entire time? I'd consider that a win for you as it's more wear/tear on THEIR vehicle during the cold weather.
 

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My 2012 Nissan LEAF SL takes a 12v the same size as my Model 3: 51R. I replaced my LEAF's original 7-year-old Japan-built 12v about two years ago with an Interstate battery from Costco for about $80 then. More recently, I've called around local auto shops to gauge availability of 51R batteries in case my Model 3 goes kaput and the three places I called all had them in stock. And that's in a city of 34,000 people. So far thankfully, I've gotten no indication my Model 3's 12v is having any problems despite being 3½ years old, 06/2018 build month.

Perhaps Tesla's source for 51R batteries is supply-chain constrained, but it would seem to me that, instead of keeping a premium-priced Model X in the shop and its owner upset albeit with a loaner, just go to the nearest Autozone or wherever and get an off-the-shelf 51R, replace it, and move on. But that's me. Maybe a 51R is not always a 51R, is not a 51R. But I doubt it.

It's a bit like restaurants that say we're out of chicken, eggplant, whatever, and are located next to a large grocery store. Really? You can't go buy another chicken or two?
The Model 3/Y (excluding the new ones that ship with the lithium ion battery) use a group size 51R battery and you can find one anywhere that sells car batteries. But the Model X uses a slightly smaller battery and I don't think the group size 51R will fit. Instead, you will have to find a group size 151R battery that's a little bit shorter and should fit. The 151R is used in some Honda and Acura vehicles, but it's not as common as the 51R.

See this page of the 12v battery manufacturer's catalog (Atlas BX) for reference. The item circled in blue is the Model 3/Y battery, but the Model X battery is two spots below listed as group size 151.
Product Rectangle Font Line Parallel


Also, installing your own 12v battery will not automatically void your entire car's warranty. For example -- If you hook it up backwards and it fries your power conversion system, you will be paying out of pocket to replace that module. But all your warranty on other items stays intact.
 
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So far thankfully, I've gotten no indication my Model 3's 12v is having any problems despite being 3½ years old, 06/2018 build month.
Mine too 🤞
 
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So which battery are you talking about? You've nomenclature for both, so it is unclear.
Because my local SC could not find a 12v battery anywhere "near" I took it to mean the 'regular old automotive 12v" which, if correct, reenforces my disappointment with Tesla service/parts. Shouldn't they have a 'wear item' in stock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
"produce more" is most definitely easier said than done these days. The global supply chain issues are so severe, companies have been removing USB ports from their vehicles!!! Though that's not an excuse to use after a month. Curious, have you had the loaner the entire time? I'd consider that a win for you as it's more wear/tear on THEIR vehicle during the cold weather.
I do have a loaner (old model S), but that was after we fought for one. They were going to give us uber credits and I told them that is not acceptable. Going on 50 days with no date on the battery. They are now telling me it is the HV battery. I'm assuming that is the main battery pack, which is sad b/c the car was a 2019 with only 17K miles on it.
 

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I have a similar problem as Aliupup. I was notified in the Tesla app that my battery was critically low = 0 on Dec 23 after being 80% charged the night before and not driving it that day. The car wouldn’t accept the charging cord. It has been at the SC since Dec 23 - “waiting on parts.” Very little info from Tesla. Very frustrating. I do have a Tesla S loaner so there is that.
 

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I have a similar problem as Aliupup. I was notified in the Tesla app that my battery was critically low = 0 on Dec 23 after being 80% charged the night before and not driving it that day. The car wouldn't accept the charging cord. It has been at the SC since Dec 23 - "waiting on parts." Very little info from Tesla. Very frustrating. I do have a Tesla S loaner so there is that.
I'm about to hit 60 days with no ETA. They just keep bumping my date by two weeks. I will sell the car if they ever fix it. This has been my third Tesla and I have had problems with all three.
 
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