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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I went ahead and made a rough calculator to assist in understanding the overall cost that is associated with the use of a supercharger with a model 3. If there is anything that I could improve on please let me know and I will do my best to adjust for that.
 

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The Supercharger rate does vary by state. Some, like UT & CO have $.13/kWh. NE & WI have tiered charging and it seems to widely vary how long you are on Level 1 or 2 and price from $.08 - $.20. MN is $.14kWh which is normal utility rate.

Off peak in MN is about $.05kWh with taxes and fees. I drove about 850 miles using my home Tesla HPWC and it cost me $54.30.

Any way you cut it, it is about 1/2 to 1/3 the price of gas (unless you use Tesla Destination Chargers which I do whenever I can... they are free).
 

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Nice sheet, but why focus on SC's? That should work for any charge, right if you input your home rates, etc. so that you know what it is costing you to charge?
 

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Fwiw in NJ the dealer took a estimate and told me if I was looking for an 80 percent charge if I remember correctly it would cost around 13 dollars..

I think we are at 17 cents per kilowatt at our homes including taxes...

Hope this helps..
 

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Some states don’t allow the supercharge rates to be per kWh because Tesla is not a utility. In those situations, Tesla charges per minute.... one rate when above 60 kW and half the per minute cost when below 60 kW.

If you are charged a kWh rate at the supercharger that is the same as at your house, supercharging would be slightly cheaper because it is DC and can be directly added to the battery. My AC charging at home has a 92% efficiency (for every kWh that I pay for, only 0.92 KWh is added to the car).
 

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Some states don't allow the supercharge rates to be per kWh because Tesla is not a utility. In those situations, Tesla charges per minute.... one rate when above 60 kW and half the per minute cost when below 60 kW.

If you are charged a kWh rate at the supercharger that is the same as at your house, supercharging would be slightly cheaper because it is DC and can be directly added to the battery. My AC charging at home has a 92% efficiency (for every kWh that I pay for, only 0.92 KWh is added to the car).
Question? Does that mean that the half rate is charged for the first 60 kWh and then the double rate is charged when the 60 kWh threshold is exceeded for the number of kWhs over 60? Or, does it mean that when you go over 60 kWh you are charged at the double rate for the whole session? (perhaps because you are using a charger for an excessive time period)
 

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Question? Does that mean that the half rate is charged for the first 60 kWh and then the double rate is charged when the 60 kWh threshold is exceeded for the number of kWhs over 60? Or, does it mean that when you go over 60 kWh you are charged at the double rate for the whole session? (perhaps because you are using a charger for an excessive time period)
Neither. I think you're confusing kWh with kW. A kWh is an amount of energy. A kW is a rate of energy transfer.

Ideally, Tesla would like to charge by the kWh (the amount). But some states only allow utilities to charge by the amount of energy. For those states, Tesla instead charges by the minute. Check here to see if a particular state allows Tesla to charge by kWh, or if they charge by the minute.

The problem with this is that supercharging slows down as the battery gets full. To help compensate for this, Tesla charges a lower per-minute rate when the energy transfer drops below 60kW.
 

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Neither. I think you're confusing kWh with kW. A kWh is an amount of energy. A kW is a rate of energy transfer.

Ideally, Tesla would like to charge by the kWh (the amount). But some states only allow utilities to charge by the amount of energy. For those states, Tesla instead charges by the minute. Check here to see if a particular state allows Tesla to charge by kWh, or if they charge by the minute.

The problem with this is that supercharging slows down as the battery gets full. To help compensate for this, Tesla charges a lower per-minute rate when the energy transfer drops below 60kW.
I don't think I'm confused, the Superchargers are rated at kW but what you pay for is by the kWh. It doesn't matter whether the charger is rated at 50 kW or 130 kW, you still will only be charged by the amount of kWh that you use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I appreciate all of the feedback! Yes this calculator would work for home charging as well, I can make an adjustment to it to allow for personal inputs of cost, at least until I can get around to finding the average cost of electricity in each state. Could be used in the future. This could work for other chargers as well but it also depends on the charger. ChargePoint, for example, is a company who offers chargers to companies to install. After installation the company decides on the cost to use there charger per minute. This also provides too much variable for a calculator like the one I have made.
 
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