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Tesla has finally taken steps to fight back against owners who disregard their warnings and disclaimers and use Autopilot cheat devices to trick the car into thinking their hands are on the wheel.

With the latest release of Full Self-Driving (FSD) Beta, the car can now detect if you are using an Autopilot cheat device and initiate a forced Autopilot disengagement, resulting in a strike if it happened while FSD Beta was engaged.

Since Autopilot was introduced, if you did not have your hands on the steering wheel the car would remind (or nag) you to apply force so that it knows you are still there and paying attention.

Seeing an opportunity to make money, companies created small weighted devices that can be attached to the wheel that provide just enough force for the computer to think it is your hands that are on the wheel. When this happens, you don’t get nagged and can drive for hundreds of miles on Autopilot or FSD Beta without having to put your hands on the wheel.

Fast forward to this week and Elon Musk announced this week that FSD Beta was now available to all owners in North America who have purchased FSD capability. Based on what we’ve been told one of the big stumbling blocks to getting to a wide release of the self-driving software, other than the obvious, was having a way to ensure owners are being responsible and not using one of the multitude of cheat devices available for purchase on the internet.

Tesla has been able to figure this out and your car can now detect when at least some of these devices are being used. According to third-party software tracker Teslascope, this new code was added with the latest FSD Beta 10.69.3.1.

This information has been corroborated by Tesla Service employees.

Tesla obviously didn’t include this new ability in the release notes, and has not officially announced it is there, so we don’t know for sure how they are detecting these devices.

One possibility is that Tesla knows when your hands are off the wheel (no force), and they also know with a high level of confidence when your hands on the wheel (varying force). While a weighted cheat device can provide the necessary feedback to trick the computer, it behaves in a very different way than a human who can’t apply the exact same amount of pressure continuously.

We assume that Tesla has analyzed the data and the differences between force and no force, and when the computer is confident enough that a cheat device is being used, you get kicked out of Autopilot.

As noted by Teslascope, not all of the Autopilot cheat devices can be detected by this new code, for now. It is assumed Tesla will continue to analyze the data and the code will mature to be able to detect most, if not all cheat devices.

If you have one of these cheat devices, let us know in the comments below if you are still able to use it with FSD Beta 10.69.3.1.

The post Tesla cracks down on Autopilot cheat devices as FSD Beta goes to wide release appeared first on Drive Tesla.

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I noticed this "improvement" on a 400-mile drive home last Sunday. The odd thing was...I don't have FSD, just plain AP; and it didn't happen on the outbound trip, and I've had no recent updates.
 

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We do not support the use of cheat devices. Please do not post how you’re overcoming this. The posts will be deleted.
 

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I just did a test with Autopilot after getting the 10.69.3.1 update. (I have FSD Beta but don’t use it since it sucks so hard.)

I strapped a weight tightly to my steering wheel to simulate a cheat device and drove on the highway with Autopilot engaged without touching the steering wheel. After 10 minutes I only got a little beep and a small message on the bottom-left of the screen asking me to “Apply slight turning force to steering wheel”. A quick tug on the wheel and the message went away. After another 10 minutes, the same thing happened again.

Maybe the forced disengagement only happens if FSD Beta is turned on??

I noticed this "improvement" on a 400-mile drive home last Sunday. The odd thing was...I don't have FSD, just plain AP; and it didn't happen on the outbound trip, and I've had no recent updates.
What exactly happened in your case?
 

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While experimenting with a device, it worked beautifully for the first half of the trip. On the second half, I got the hands-on wheel warnings I would expect to have gotten if I'd had no device at all.
Thanks. I just wanted to clarify that you didn’t get a forced disengagement like some others are reporting. I’m guessing the disengagements are only for people with FSD Beta enabled, and otherwise you just get a “nag”.
 

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Even with FSD off, an Autopilot disengagement was called a strike. I had turned off FSD only to lose access by an Autopilot disengagement.

One lesson learned is the automatic stop light and traffic sign option is risky at intersections. Turning it off has reduced the probability of Autopilot disengagements.

Bob Wilson
 
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I just did a test with Autopilot after getting the 10.69.3.1 update. (I have FSD Beta but don’t use it since it sucks so hard.)

I strapped a weight tightly to my steering wheel to simulate a cheat device and drove on the highway with Autopilot engaged without touching the steering wheel. After 10 minutes I only got a little beep and a small message on the bottom-left of the screen asking me to “Apply slight turning force to steering wheel”. A quick tug on the wheel and the message went away. After another 10 minutes, the same thing happened again.

Maybe the forced disengagement only happens if FSD Beta is turned on??



What exactly happened in your case?
FYI: I did some more testing. As noted above, the first two times I went a full 10 minutes in Autopilot without touching the wheel, I only got nags. But the next (third) time I tried, I got a forced disengagement and a FSD Beta “strike”.

The testing also showed that using turn scroll wheels and stalk controls does not prevent the forced disengagements from occurring after 10 minutes. Only manually applying torque to the steering wheel seems to do any good.
 

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FYI: I did some more testing. As noted above, the first two times I went a full 10 minutes in Autopilot without touching the wheel, I only got nags. But the next (third) time I tried, I got a forced disengagement and a FSD Beta “strike”.

The testing also showed that using turn scroll wheels and stalk controls does not prevent the forced disengagements from occurring after 10 minutes. Only manually applying torque to the steering wheel seems to do any good.
Trying to understand the problem with curved, dashed, intersections, I quickly racked up four strikes. So I turned off FSD but continued to drive on Autopilot. Then I got my fifth strike from an Autopilot disengagement… passing through an intersection.

FSD has a problem with curved, dashed lines and intersections with rising or lowered crossing streets. It appears to be reproducible but strikeouts have stopped my testing. Worse, the Tesla team will get no more feedback of these problems from me.

AI depends on learning. But strikeouts instead of disengagements means this problem will not be fixed. BTW, no defeat device was used as mine had broken a couple of months before.

Bob Wilson
 
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I have tested this in the past but not since the last update. It was always iffy at best. I don't have an issue keeping hands on the wheel, but sometimes the turning force required to keep the warnings at bay seems too high. It feels like I'm right on the verge of disengaging autosteer.
 

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... but sometimes the turning force required to keep the warnings at bay seems too high. It feels like I'm right on the verge of disengaging autosteer.
And it's not about keeping hand(s) on wheel - it's about keeping a change in force against the direction AP wants to steer.

And a VERY annoying (and sometimes dangerous) part of the AP disengagement issue is it keeps TACC engaged.
 

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...but sometimes the turning force required to keep the warnings at bay seems too high.
The issue isn't the amount of force. The issue is that the car is only checking for force on the wheel about once every second or two. You're probably already putting enough force on the wheel, but you need to be patient and wait for the car to actually poll the steering wheel sensor before it will respond.

Once I figured this out, I no longer had any accidental disengagements.
 

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And a VERY annoying (and sometimes dangerous) part of the AP disengagement issue is it keeps TACC engaged.
It's crucial that disengaging AP in this way keep TACC engaged, in my opinion. People with NOA often worry about lane-changes on AP without NOA. Part of what makes them work is that when you signal, it becomes easy to disengage AP with the steering wheel, but TACC keeps on, facilitating the lane change.
 

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My 'strikes' came at poorly painted, dashed line intersections when I had to snatch the wheel to avoid driving into other cars. It is an area I would like to explore but I've 'struck out.'

Bob Wilson
 
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It's crucial that disengaging AP in this way keep TACC engaged, in my opinion. People with NOA often worry about lane-changes on AP without NOA. Part of what makes them work is that when you signal, it becomes easy to disengage AP with the steering wheel, but TACC keeps on, facilitating the lane change.
With FSD-ß-ß when it does really stupid things and gives up on steering when it's making a turn (and should be slowing down), it leaves TACC at the previously set speed heading, usually, straight for a foreign (or domestic - are kerbs foreign objects?). THTA's when steering disengagement and leaving TACC on is DANGEROUS.

Not only does the driver / operator / observer need to keep hand(s) on wheel, but feet(s) ready to brake or disengage via the stalk.

Would make an interesting phase in one of those computerized driving test training scenarios.
 

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With FSD-ß-ß when it does really stupid things and gives up on steering when it's making a turn (and should be slowing down), it leaves TACC at the previously set speed heading, usually, straight for a foreign (or domestic - are kerbs foreign objects?). THTA's when steering disengagement and leaving TACC on is DANGEROUS.

Not only does the driver / operator / observer need to keep hand(s) on wheel, but feet(s) ready to brake or disengage via the stalk.

Would make an interesting phase in one of those computerized driving test training scenarios.
Yes--that sounds terrible! I don't have FSD, though. Disengaging FSD (which includes the car making turns) should disengage TACC, but in my opinion disengaging AP (which is just lane-keeping) should not.
 
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